Blood In the Mobile (2010)

Blood In the Mobile is the name of a documentary film by Danish film director Frank Piasecki Poulsen. The film is addressing the issue of illegal cassiterite mining in the North-Kivu province in eastern DR Congo, focusing on the cassiterite mine in Bisie. The film is co-financed by Danish, German, Finnish, Hungarian and Irish television, as well as the Danish National film board. The film premiered in Denmark on September 1, 2010. During the making of the film Frank Piasecki Poulsen is working with communications professional and new media entrepreneur Mikkel Skov Petersen on the online campaign of the same name. The campaign is addressing Poulsen and Petersens notion of the responsibility of the manufacturers of mobile phones on the situation in war torn eastern Congo. The project is collaborating with ngo’s like Dutch-based Make It Fair and British-based Global Witness who are also engaged in changing the conduct of Western companies regarding the industrial use of minerals of unknown origin. The cassiterite dug out in the illegal mines in North-Kivu is according to Danish corporate monitor organization Danwatch primarily purchased as tin by the electronics industry after processing in East Asia. Apart from trying to raise awareness of the issue of illegal mining and alleged lack of corporate social responsibility from the mobile phone industry, the campaign is an attempt to experiment with new ways of building an audience and create additional funding for documentary films. The production of the film and the campaign is run in association with Danish new media company Spacesheep, founded in 2009 by Poulsen and Petersen in association with major Danish independent TV and film production company Koncern.

Vir: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_in_the_Mobile

Napotilo: http://bloodinthemobile.org/

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Blood Coltan (2008)

This is a story about the real costs of our need to stay in touch. Mobile phones have hidden tariffs with unimaginable human consequences: rape, murder and illegal slave labour.

Unser täglich Brot (2005)

Our Daily Bread  or Unser täglich Brot is an award winning 2005 documentary directed, co-produced, and with cinematography by Nikolaus Geyrhalter. The script was co-written by Wolfgang Widerhofer and Nikolaus Geyrhalter. The film depicts how modern food production companies employ technology to maximize efficiency, consumer safety and profit. It consists mainly of actual working situations without voice-over narration or interviews as the director tries to let viewers form their own opinion on the subject. The names of the companies where the footage was filmed are purposely not shown. The director’s goal is to provide a realistic view on the internal workings of multiple food production companies in our modern society. Vir: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unser_taglich_Brot

Ways of Seeing (1972)

Ways of Seeing is a 1972 BBC four-part television series of 30 minute films created chiefly by writer John Berger and producer Mike Dibb. Berger’s scripts were adapted into a book of the same name. The series and book criticize traditional Western cultural aesthetics by raising questions about hidden ideologies in visual images. The series is partially a response to Kenneth Clark’s Civilisation series, which represents a more traditionalist view of the Western artistic and cultural canon.

Vir: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ways_of_Seeing



The Money Fix (2008)

Just where does that dollar in your pocket originate? The answer is that all money enters the economy as bank debt. So what? You may ask. This seemingly innocuous detail is actually at the core of many of the social and environmental problems of today. Join us on a voyage that will utterly transform the way you perceive money. Many leading thinkers expose the truth about money and what we can do about it in this feature length documentary.

Vir: http://www.themoneyfix.org/

Guns, Germs and Steel (2004)

Jared Diamond’s journey of discovery began on the island of Papua New Guinea. There, in 1974, a local named Yali asked Diamond a deceptively simple question: “Why is it that you white people developed so much cargo, but we black people had little cargo of our own?”

On November 15th 1532, 168 Spanish conquistadors arrive in the holy city of Cajamarca, at the heart of the Inca Empire, in Peru. They are exhausted, outnumbered and terrified – ahead of them are camped 80,000 Inca troops and the entourage of the Emperor himself. Yet, within just 24 hours, more than 7,000 Inca warriors lie slaughtered; the Emperor languishes in chains; and the victorious Europeans begin a reign of colonial terror which will sweep through the entire American continent.

So far, Jared Diamond has demonstrated how geography favoured one group of people – Europeans – endowing them with agents of conquest ahead of their rivals around the world. Guns, germs and steel allowed Europeans to colonize vast tracts of the globe – but what happened when this all-conquering package arrived in Africa, the birthplace of humanity?